Teens accused of breaking into NJ petting zoo, letting the animals out, putting lipstick on miniature pony

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At least six teenagers are accused of breaking into a New Jersey petting zoo this weekend, and allegedly mistreated some animals, let other animals out of the pens and put lipstick on a miniature pony, according to reports.

Abma’s Farms, home to rabbits, sheep, pigs, goats, and at least one miniature pony, in Wyckoff, 30 miles east of New York City, wrote about the break-in and vandalism on Facebook.

At least six teenaged alleged trespassers have been accused of breaking into a New Jersey petting zoo this weekend, according to reports. (Google)

The kids “opened gates and rode our miniature donkeys, who should not be supporting that much weight. One person took a Snapchat of another person riding our mini donkey and applied the Abma’s Farm geofilter.”

“We caught two other trespassers trying to steal,” the post continued. “When we called the police, the two fled the scene.”

Wyckoff Police Department is currently trying to track down the teens.

No arrests have been made.

Jimmy Abma, one of the farm’s owners discovered the commotion Saturday at about 10 p.m.

Police have leads on the suspects based on a Snapchat photo Abma received, which showed “a female party who had been riding a donkey in the petting zoo” and “other persons who were involved,” Wyckoff Police Department said in a release.

Abma’s Farms, home to rabbits, sheep, pigs, goats, and at least one miniature pony, in Wyckoff, 30 miles east of New York City, wrote about the incident on Facebook. (Google)

“First and foremost, we are a working farm, and four families (and four generations) live here,” the Abma family wrote on Facebook. “This is our home.”

Aside from the personal violation that the family feels there is a safety issue because breaking into animal pens could be dangerous.

Animals can kick, rear up, and trample you. In the dark, anything can happen,” Abma said.

But the safety of the animals was also put in jeopardy, which has also upset the family.

“Our animals are now shaken and skiddish (sic) compared to their normal relaxed nature,” Abma said. “This is very troubling to us.”

This content was originally published here.

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